FCEVs

What are FCEVs?

FCEV stands for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle. FCEVs are a type of vehicle that use compressed hydrogen gas as fuel to generate electric power via a highly efficient energy converter, a fuel cell. The fuel cell transforms the hydrogen directly into electricity to power an electric engine.

Why use FCEVs?

The distinguishing attribute and main benefit of these vehicles is that when driven they produce zero harmful tail pipe emissions, with water vapour being their only by-product. Additionally, since fuel cells do not rely on combustion and have few moving parts, they significantly reduce noise emissions.

FCEVs use hydrogen which is a very versatile fuel that can be generated from a wide range of sources, including renewable. Even when hydrogen is generated from natural gas, as it is done conventionally, the fuel cell can significantly reduce the amount of carbon emissions compared to a diesel engine. When produced from low carbon sources (renewable, biomass or nuclear energy), the carbon emissions are completely eliminated.

In short, FCEVs offer a cleaner, quieter and more efficient mobility option when compared to conventional vehicles.

Key benefits

FCEVs have a key role to play in the decarbonisation of the transport sector, offering three significant benefits to Europe and to the wider, global economy:

energy security
ENERGY SECURITY

As hydrogen is widely available and can be produced from a variety of local renewable processes, it offers independence from the over-reliance on energy imports.

enviornmental improvement
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS

Decarbonising the transport sector will reduce emissions, limit the impact of damaging climate change and improve human health well into the future. Hydrogen has a critical role to play in contributing to this.

econ development
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Europe has developed extensive expertise in the area of hydrogen and fuel cell electric vehicles technology. The development of a new hydrogen-based transport sector provides the opportunity to create new businesses, new jobs and wider economic growth for Europe.

Vehicles deployed under H2ME

Fahrzeugübersicht H2ME

Two types of fuel cell electric vehicle will be deployed under H2ME: fuel cell electric cars and fuel cell range-extended vans. The fuel cell powertrain is a modular assembly. Various configuration concepts can thus be realized in the vehicle with the spatial design of different vehicle models being taken into consideration. The fuel cell powertrain comprises the following key components: fuel cell stack, system module, hydrogen tanks, battery, and electric Motor.

 

 

Fuel Cell Electric cars

The B-Class F-Cell (Daimler) vehicles are fitted with a 700-bar hydrogen tank in the sandwich floor unit. Its electric motor develops an output of 100 kW, with a torque of 290 Nm, and thus has the power rating of a two-litre gasoline engine. The zero-emission drive system consumes the equivalent of 3.3 litres of diesel per 100 kilometres (NEDC).

The Tucson ix35 Fuel Cell (Hyundai) is the first mass production model of Hyundai’s fuel cell vehicle. The fuel cell system of the ix35 is integrated for high performance and efficiency, and two 700 bar hydrogen tanks provide long distance driving range.

Fuel Cell Range-Extended Vans

The Symbio FCell range-extended fuel cell vehicles are powered by a compact 5 kW fuel cell module, coupled with a light 350bar hydrogen storage unit, a medium-size automotive battery pack and integrated onto a well-established OEM platform produced at volume (Renault Kangoo ZE). The Symbio FCell stack doubles the range of the electric-only Kangoo ZE base vehicle.

Driving Experience

Drivers of FCEVs do not need to compromise in terms of practicality and performance, with FCEVs providing a smoother, quieter and more responsive driving experience than conventional petrol and diesel cars. FCEVs are based on durable and compact systems which provide a consistent driving character regardless of the environment or climate.

range
RANGE

The FCEVs currently being prepared for commercialisation have a driving range comparable to petrol and diesel vehicles, typically between 385 and 700 km (240 and 435 miles) on a full tank.

refuelling-time
REFUELLING TIME

Industrial gas companies have developed hydrogen fuel dispensing systems that are safe and simple to use. International standards ensure compatibility between refuelling stations and vehicles, and the refuelling process takes around 3 to 5 minutes offering refuelling times similar to those of conventional petrol or diesel cars.

driving-performance
DRIVING EXPERIENCE

Drivers of FCEVs do not need to compromise in terms of practicality and performance, with FCEVs providing a smoother, quieter and more responsive driving experience than conventional petrol and diesel cars. FCEVs are based on durable and compact systems which provide a consistent driving character regardless of the environment or climate.